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November 18, 2017

The title says it all. Zelda has Hyrule, Mario has the Mushroom Kingdom, Elder Scrolls has Tamriel and so on. We need a name for the world the game takes place in. We are asking for suggestions from anyone and everyone. If we choose your suggestion we will give you a $50 gift card to Steam, or simply $50 via Paypal. We will make an announcement on Facebook/Twitter with the winner when and if one is chosen. Please email info@stingbotgames.com, or if you follow us on Twitter or Facebook you can simply reply with your suggestions.

Thanks for being a part of our development process. We look forward to hearing your suggestions!

August 31, 2017

Music can really strengthen a game and make you fall in love with it. Mario 64 would have been a very different experience for me if it wasn't for the beautiful melody that is Dire Dire Docks. I remember swimming around collecting red coins just to listen to the music on repeat. Or how about the original Mario on NES? Remember the first time you entered level 1.2? Such a simple theme and so classic. Makes me happy just thinking about it. Music can play with our emotions and make us feel things we didn't know we could feel. It does truly have a profound effect on us.

Game development is actually something a bit newer to me in my life. I actually have the most experience in writing, recording and playing music. I started playing piano at the age of 7 and guitar at 15, which then led to singing, playing bass and drums as well. I played in a band for 8 years in my late teens to mid 20s, toured some of the world and I've released 3 albums and several E.P.s. I have and will always love music....

July 9, 2017

As an indie game developer it’s very difficult to juggle time between development and marketing, so I decided not to spread myself too thin. I wanted to focus on just a few social networks to promote our upcoming game, The Forbidden Arts. I decided on Facebook, Twitter and Youtube.  With nearly 2 billion users, Facebook was a prime choice and should be a no brainer for anyone wanting to promote their business or services on a social network.

Once I got started with Facebook and began to build a following for the game I realized how expensive Facebook promotions actually are. This isn’t meant to be a deterrent from using Facebook. Quite the opposite. I value Facebook quite a bit and we intend to use it as one of our main sources of marketing in the future. This blog is intended to shed some light on our experiences with such costs, and how we run effective campaigns.

I decided to run a test for this Blog. I posted a promotional image to the Forbidden Arts Facebook page.

Before I ran this c...

April 16, 2017

Do you ever wonder what game developers are thinking about when they come up with the concepts for the characters, environments or mechanics?  One thing I’ve heard time and time again throughout my life is “Write what you know.”  This is a saying that doesn’t need to be taken literally, but rather as a generalization.  In my case, The Forbidden Arts is a representation of me.  It’s what I know, what I love and in many ways, what I’ve experienced.

When Shigeru Miaymoto created The Legend of Zelda series, a lot of the world he created was a representation of what he loved as a child, exploring the countryside of Japan.  J.K. Rowling, author of the Harry Potter series, claims that the absence of any meaningful relationship with her father and the loss of her mother have been two of the most important influences on her writing.

The point is: stick to what you know and love.  When you create something without meaning, more than likely it will feel empty and dull.  When you have...

April 3, 2017

How the player navigates a game world is very important in game design.  The 90s are long gone, and so are the days of creating expansive game worlds where players must set out on foot with no way of speeding up their travel besides a horse or using a potion to increase run speed.  Open-World games have done a lot right when it comes to traveling within a game’s world.  I’m going to reference two modern masterpieces that really do a great job with traveling and exploration: The Witcher 3 and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.  Both games are fantastic and I highly recommend playing them for both entertainment and/or honing your craft of game development, whatever that may be.  Each game focuses heavily on exploration, but I feel one game does a little better of a job than the other: Breath of The Wild.  In both games, once the player discovers a new area, they will then learn what places of interest are available within that area.  In the case of Witcher, discovering road maps, c...

March 26, 2017

In a previous blog, I discussed my thought process of level design. We thought it would be fun to take an in-depth look at what goes into building a scene. This past week I have been documenting the process of creating a scene.  After viewing the 3d environment art our team had created, I was very excited to start working on the scene The Desert of Marzule.  I loved the aesthetics and knew this would be a fun scene to put together.

Each scene is broken up into several parts that we call sections.  By splitting the scene into sections, this allows us a lot more customization for each section, as we tend to focus on one small portion of the scene at a time.  Also, from a performance standpoint: this allows us to limit the amount of 3d assets rendered on screen at any given time.  There is never more than 3 sections visible while playing the game.  This greatly helps to improve performance on some machines.  When building a scene I can deactivate and activate sections to work on whate...

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